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CSPC's Prosperity or Decline Report Featured in Government Executive Magazine

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CSPC's latest report "Prosperity or Decline? Breaking Washington's Deadlock to Save America's Future" was recently featured in Government Executive Magazine. Comparing the CSPC report with an essay by Arthur C. Brooks, the president of the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, Timothy Clarke's article (found here) states:

Brooks' argument against government expansionism is echoed in less ideological form in the final report of the CPSC's Strengthening America's Future Initiative, issued in April. It too posits a key turning point and seeks to lay out ideas for "regaining our strategic and financial freedom of action, unity at home and standing abroad." CPSC President David Abshire, former Colorado Gov. Roy Romer, leading defense industrialist and Pentagon official Norman Augustine, and former Comptroller General David M. Walker led the initiative's steering committee. Walker is now president of the Peter G. Peterson Foundation, which funded the study.

It raises the alarm about the looming fiscal crisis. Interest on the nation's debt soon could be the largest item in the federal budget, buying us nothing of value, the study notes. And it steps up the argument a notch, suggesting we soon might face a situation analogous to the time when, as one of its leading creditors, we forced the British government to abandon a plan to regain control of the Suez Canal. In "an American Suez," China and other major purchasers of U.S. debt might similarly face what British leader Harold MacMillan called "the last gasp of a declining power."

While focusing principally on the fiscal challenge, the CPSC report recommends government undertakes comprehensive political and programmatic reform - in electoral practices; congressional committee restructuring; civil service training; new policies to enhance educational achievement and proficiency in math, science and engineering; energy consumption; infrastructure improvement; immigration policies; and more.